What Am I Saying If I Vote NO on Proposition 8?

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A "NO" vote on Proposition 8 effectively says that you agree with ALL of the following:



  1. That you accept and support an incident where activist judges took it upon themselves to overrule a statute that was already voted on and passed by the majority of voters in the State of California. This statute was Proposition 22, which passed with a majority of 61.4%.



  2. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  3. That you accept and support an incident where members of the Judicial branch of government breached the separation of powers and legislated new law in the State of California. According to the U. S. Constitution, the Legislative branch has the power to create laws, and the Judicial branch has the power only to enforce them.



  4. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  5. That you accept the notion of Homosexual/Gay/Same-sex marriage.



  6. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  7. That you accept any resulting legal ramifications that will ensue by allowing Homosexual/Gay/Same-sex marriage.



  8. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  9. That you accept any resulting social ramifications that will ensue by allowing Homosexual/Gay/Same-sex marriage.



  10. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  11. That you disagree with all individuals, groups, and organizations that support Proposition 8, including legal groups, family advocacy groups, and almost every church in the State of California.



  12. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  13. That you believe that the agenda of homosexual activists should be given priority over all other considerations.



  14. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  15. That you support legislation that will pave the way for polyandry, legalized polygamy, or any other redefinition of marriage.



  16. FURTHER READING ON THIS ISSUE





  17. That you do not believe that there are better, legal means by which homosexuals may attempt to expand their rights than to have judges thrust unpopular decisions on an unwilling populace.